Basement Wall Finishing

Basement Wall Finishing

Frequently Asked Questions Q. Is the Basement Finishing System™ available in stores? A. To assure optimum results, it is offered and installed by our Basement Finishing System™ certified professionals. Q. What advantages does it have over traditional drywall? A. Many. Drywall dents easily, restricts access to your foundation, is damaged by moisture and is subject to mold and rot. The Owens Corning® Basement Finishing System™ helps eliminate these problems, and others. Q. Will it waterproof my basement? A. The Basement Finishing System™ panels are moisture-resistant to accommodate high-humidity environments, but cannot correct an existing water problem in your basement. Q. How long does it take to install? A. The Owens Corning® Basement Finishing System™ can be installed in less time and with less mess than traditional drywall. An average basement can be completed in about 2 weeks. Read the Entire FAQ
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Basement Wall Finishing

Keep It Dry Check for any water issues in your basement before beginning the planning process. Obvious signs are pools of water or drips coming through the below-grade walls. Check outside to make sure the ground is graded away from your foundation. Also look for cracks in your foundation walls and repair that damage if necessary. Know the Code After you’ve taken care of any moisture problems and have come up with your plan, it’s time to check with your local municipality to see if you’ll be required to get any permits. This is particularly important if you’re planning plumbing and electrical work, which may have to be inspected. Consider the Fasteners Basement walls and floors are generally some sort of masonry, cement, block or brick, and a regular ‘ol nail or screw isn’t going to cut it when attaching framing. You’ll need to get the proper fastener and possibly anchors for your wall type. In some cases, you may need to rent a powder-actuated fastener, sometimes referred to as a shotgun fastener. These are similar to a shotgun in that they use a charge to fire a fastener into concrete. Add a Vapor Barrier Even after taking care of any moisture issues, your basement can become a damp place. You’ll need to add a vapor barrier to both the walls and floors prior to framing and finishing off these surfaces. It’s a good idea to lay down a vapor barrier for a day or two, then check underneath to see if and how much moisture may be coming through before continuing. Create an Offset Space Despite all efforts, even with a vapor barrier, moisture can still be an issue. Create a slight offset from the outside wall by adding thin slats of wood or metal called furring strips. These strips can also be used to help level out a wall that may be “wavy” to create a flat surface for adding framing. Keep Out the Cold and the Warmth In Insulation will not only help control the temperature inside your basement, it may also add another layer of moisture control, as well as help dampen sound from the outside. Choose an insulation that includes a vapor barrier on both sides. Other options include a spray foam insulation. Be sure to check code requirements for this type. Drop Ceilings Provide Easy Access A drop, or suspended, ceiling offers a way to both conceal and provide access to electrical and plumbing lines via the removable tiles. You may have a preconceived notion that such a ceiling will look more like an office than a home, but there are plenty of attractive options available. These ceilings will reduce the amount of overhead space available, so keep that in mind when planning. Give Your Lighting a Recess Recessed lighting in a basement is a good option, because they won’t take up valuable overhead space that a light fixture would. Plus, it’s easy to install with a drop ceiling. Add Some Warmth at the Baseboards Warm air rises, so it makes sense to install heating vents at floor level. Baseboard heating is a good option, but make sure it makes sense for your plan and is easy to tie into your existing HVAC system. For a finished space, you want to make sure you’re not relying on space heaters, so plan carefully. The Utility Room is Not for Finishing Keep the space housing an HVAC unit or units and water heaters clear, open, and unfinished. These spaces have specific code requirements for spacing and framing, plus you’ll need access for inspection and/or repairs. You may be tempted to finish off this area, but keep it simple to avoid problems later.
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Basement Wall Finishing

The basement is a unique space, and a demanding environment to finish. Unlike the rest of your house, the basement sits below ground level and is surrounded by soil that remains cold and wet. When traditionally finishing a basement, this can pose many problems. However, by applying some basic “building science” to the design process, a basement can be safely finished. That’s why choosing the right finishing materials for your basement is a crucial step towards creating a safe and healthy living environment for years to come.
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Basement Wall Finishing

If you have a wet or damp basement, you must deal with the problem before you get started. To tell if walls are damp from exterior water or just condensation from humid interior air, tape a 2-ft. square sheet of plastic to the masonry. If moisture collects on the front of the plastic, you have condensation. The method we show for finishing will take care of that problem. If moisture collects on the backside after a few days, then water is wicking through the foundation wall from outside. The basement should be treated the same as if it were leaky. If you have regular seepage or water puddling after storms (even once every few years), you have to fix it permanently before finishing. Remedies for damp or wet basements can be as simple as rerouting downspouts, regrading slopes away from foundation walls, or applying water-resistant paints to interior surfaces. As a last resort, hire a pro to install perimeter drains and a sump pump. The bottom line is that it’s senseless to spend time and money finishing a basement if leaks or moisture will ruin your work or cause mold to grow.
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Basement Wall Finishing

How to Frame Out Basement Walls Shopping List 1. Polyethylene plastic sheeting and duct tape used to test wall for excessive moisture   2. Hydraulic cement   for patching holes in wall   3. Polystyrene foam board   used to insulate basement walls   4. 1×3 spruce boards   used to create a furring-strip grid on wall for attaching drywall   5. 4-inch-long spring spikes   used to secure horizontal 1x3s to wall   6. 1 5/8-inch drywall screws   used to attach vertical 1x3s to horizontal 1x3s   7. Electrical boxes, cable, connectors and devices   needed if planning to electrify the wall ×
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Basement Wall Finishing

How to Frame Out Basement Walls Shopping List 1. Polyethylene plastic sheeting and duct tape used to test wall for excessive moisture   2. Hydraulic cement   for patching holes in wall   3. Polystyrene foam board   used to insulate basement walls   4. 1×3 spruce boards   used to create a furring-strip grid on wall for attaching drywall   5. 4-inch-long spring spikes   used to secure horizontal 1x3s to wall   6. 1 5/8-inch drywall screws   used to attach vertical 1x3s to horizontal 1x3s   7. Electrical boxes, cable, connectors and devices   needed if planning to electrify the wall
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Basement Wall Finishing

Turn your unfinished basement into beautiful, functional living space. Framing basement walls and ceilings is the core of any basement finishing project. Learn how to insulate and frame the walls and ceilings, build soffits, frame partition walls and frame around obstructions.
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Basement Wall Finishing

Finishing a portion of a basement is an inexpensive way to gain valuable space for a family room, game room or other use. The big question is how to finish the foundation walls. We’ll assume that you have either a poured concrete or a cement block masonry wall. With either surface, the finishing options are the same.
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1. Polyethylene plastic sheeting and duct tape used to test wall for excessive moisture   2. Hydraulic cement   for patching holes in wall   3. Polystyrene foam board   used to insulate basement walls   4. 1×3 spruce boards   used to create a furring-strip grid on wall for attaching drywall   5. 4-inch-long spring spikes   used to secure horizontal 1x3s to wall   6. 1 5/8-inch drywall screws   used to attach vertical 1x3s to horizontal 1x3s   7. Electrical boxes, cable, connectors and devices   needed if planning to electrify the wall
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The Owens Corning Basement Finishing System is designed to allow you to add more living space in far less time than a drywall basement. It also helps absorb sound, is easily removable for foundation access, and is mold and mildew resistant.
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Transform Your Space The Owens Corning Basement Finishing System is designed to allow you to add more living space in far less time than a drywall basement. It also helps absorb sound, is easily removable for foundation access, and is mold and mildew resistant. Get a Quote Today
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Features and Benefits Removable Wall panels remove for foundation, electrical and plumbing access. Mold & Mildew Resistant Unlike drywall, Owens Corning Basement Finishing system wall panels are inorganic and not a food source for mold and mildew. Acoustic With an 85% sound absorption (.85 NRC), you can count on better acoustic control compared to drywall. Peace of Mind Relax and know your investment is protected by a Lifetime Limited Warranty that is transferable to the next homeowner.

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