How To Clean Bathroom Tile Grout

How To Clean Bathroom Tile Grout

5 Essential Grout Cleaning Tips  Cleaning grout isn’t just about the type of tile cleaner you use; it’s also about the methods you employ for getting the stains out. The best way to lift the maximum amount of dirt and grime is to apply a solution and give it enough time to soak in and work, before scrubbing it off. Here is a step-by-step guide: Use a dry broom or mop to wipe across the floor tiles, or a dry cloth to wipe wall tiles, before starting the grout cleaning process. This gets rid of any dust that’s accumulated, affording you better access to the grout. Apply your chosen cleaning solution to the grout, ensuring all areas are well covered. You may find that you need to keep applying the solution regularly as it soaks in. You don’t want to saturate the floor, but you want to make sure the crevices are well covered. Leave the tile cleaner for around 30 minutes – enough time to loosen the stains, making them easier to lift off. Use a hard-bristled brush to scrub the grout clean. DIY stores sell dedicated grout brushes, but you may find that an old toothbrush works just as well – just remember not to use it in your mouth afterwards! Rinse the floor or wall with clean water and dry. For stubborn stains, you may find you need to repeat the process on a regular basis to see optimal results. Tile Cleaning Tips  When it comes to tile cleaning, it’s actually a very similar process. Stores sell specialized tile cleaner, but you can choose to make your own using bleach, or a similar thick paste of baking soda and water. If you’ve got marble tiles, however, it’s best to stick to a mild dishwashing soap, as acidic products – even things like vinegar – can cause damage. Apart from troublesome areas of caked-on food and dirt, you shouldn’t need to scrub as vigorously as when cleaning grout. A good quality cloth will usually suffice. Cleaning Bathroom Tiles  Cleaning bathroom tiles can be frustrating, as it can seem that grout becomes discoloured almost as soon as it’s been cleaned. Bathroom tiles – especially wall tiles around a bath or shower cubicle – are also vulnerable to mould growth, which is particularly evident in white and other light coloured grouts. White vinegar is good for tackling mould, but its worthwhile looking for a tile cleaner with mould inhibitors that prevent any further growth. You’ll need to clean regularly for these inhibitors to work to the best of their ability. Tile and Grout Cleaning Maintenance Make sure you include tile and grout cleaning as part of your regular cleaning schedule to slow down the discolouration of grout. Try to vacuum tiled floors on a daily basis, and mop or wipe on a weekly basis. It’s also beneficial to use a steam cleaner on tiles periodically to minimize ground-in dirt. Be sure to clean up any spills as soon as possible, to prevent stains from adhering to the floor. Clean tiles and grout improve the appearance of any kitchen or bathroom, making the room appear brighter, cleaner, and larger. Try these tips, and the results will speak for themselves.
how to clean bathroom tile grout 1

How To Clean Bathroom Tile Grout

I wanted to take the time and quickly offer some praise where it is well-deserved for this wonderful cleaning “recipe” on tile grout, it worked AMAZINGLY well. I was very skeptical, but like many others, I had perused the internet in search of something to the effect of this post that detailed a more “natural” means to cleaning the shower and it sounded like just what we needed, so, I figured I’d give it a try. Unlike an apartment shower, our bathroom and especially the shower-area are done in real (large) tile which also accompany equally big grout lines, as our house was built in the 20’s. Although the bathroom has been updated, for some reason the tile chosen for this room is very stubborn and difficult to clean. I can poor gallons of bleach and other bathroom-specific cleaners on it, to no avail. I usually can keep up with it fairly easily, especially since there are only two of us in the household each only taking one shower per day (versus a home with a higher “traffic” area to the shower), but over the past few months a few illnesses and a recent job change, among other things, had left it neglected to a level of pure disgust and covered, COVERED in slimy, black mold. I wish I had taken before and after pictures, but please be assured either way, that this recipe WORKS! I should note that for my mixture I used 1/3 of a cup for everything, instead of 1/4. However, the general guide I adhered to was 3 parts baking soda to 1 part bleach. I stirred until a thick paste, and then spread on all of my tile grout. I then scrubbed with a toothbrush (I should also note, that I also had on-hand a much larger scrubbing brush I could have used but it did not work well for me in doing this task), and then allowed it to sit for 15-20 minutes because I had a more substantial area to cover. After I rinsed, I did notice an improvement but I was initially disappointed in the results since I did not feel the grout was truly clean. However, I recall the post on this topic stating that occasionally grout is an off-white color and can appear darker with time or when wet. This was the case for my shower. Once it dried, my shower was noticeably cleaner. The grout is normally a “sand” color to match our tiles, and while the color is still maintained, it is greatly brightened and clear of any mildew and in our case, hard water deposits. Anyone with a tough grout problem needs to give this a try before they give up, spend a fortune in various cleaners, or resort to a professional. This was a great tip that is so worthy of mentioning and it so worth the effort and eventual results. Thank you, Jessi for posting about this so that I could find it and save my poor shower! Lol
how to clean bathroom tile grout 2

How To Clean Bathroom Tile Grout

Hi Jessi!!I wanted to take the time and quickly offer some praise where it is well-deserved for this wonderful cleaning “recipe” on tile grout, it worked AMAZINGLY well. I was very skeptical, but like many others, I had perused the internet in search of something to the effect of this post that detailed a more “natural” means to cleaning the shower and it sounded like just what we needed, so, I figured I’d give it a try. Unlike an apartment shower, our bathroom and especially the shower-area are done in real (large) tile which also accompany equally big grout lines, as our house was built in the 20’s. Although the bathroom has been updated, for some reason the tile chosen for this room is very stubborn and difficult to clean. I can poor gallons of bleach and other bathroom-specific cleaners on it, to no avail. I usually can keep up with it fairly easily, especially since there are only two of us in the household each only taking one shower per day (versus a home with a higher “traffic” area to the shower), but over the past few months a few illnesses and a recent job change, among other things, had left it neglected to a level of pure disgust and covered, COVERED in slimy, black mold. I wish I had taken before and after pictures, but please be assured either way, that this recipe WORKS! I should note that for my mixture I used 1/3 of a cup for everything, instead of 1/4. However, the general guide I adhered to was 3 parts baking soda to 1 part bleach. I stirred until a thick paste, and then spread on all of my tile grout. I then scrubbed with a toothbrush (I should also note, that I also had on-hand a much larger scrubbing brush I could have used but it did not work well for me in doing this task), and then allowed it to sit for 15-20 minutes because I had a more substantial area to cover. After I rinsed, I did notice an improvement but I was initially disappointed in the results since I did not feel the grout was truly clean. However, I recall the post on this topic stating that occasionally grout is an off-white color and can appear darker with time or when wet. This was the case for my shower. Once it dried, my shower was noticeably cleaner. The grout is normally a “sand” color to match our tiles, and while the color is still maintained, it is greatly brightened and clear of any mildew and in our case, hard water deposits. Anyone with a tough grout problem needs to give this a try before they give up, spend a fortune in various cleaners, or resort to a professional. This was a great tip that is so worthy of mentioning and it so worth the effort and eventual results. Thank you, Jessi for posting about this so that I could find it and save my poor shower! Lol

How To Clean Bathroom Tile Grout

How To Clean Bathroom Tile Grout
How To Clean Bathroom Tile Grout
How To Clean Bathroom Tile Grout
How To Clean Bathroom Tile Grout

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