Japanese Kitchen Knife

Japanese Kitchen Knife

Home / Cutlery Japanese Kitchen Knives Often MetroKitchen customer service experts are asked, “What type of knife should I buy? A Japanese knife or a German knife?” It depends on the types of foods you most often cook. We recommend Japanese knives when you cook many veggies, lots of chicken and fish. If you make sushi, check out our selection of sushi knives. Japanese knives have a more narrow angle, approximately 15 degrees as compared to most German knives at 20 to 25 degrees. As a result of this angle, a Japanese knife is a bit sharper but requires more frequent sharpening. These brands are manufactured in Japan and feature Western and Japanese styles of knives. Global Knives Razor sharp and exceptionally light, Global knives are unique in the world of fine cutlery. Shun Knives by KAI Stunningly beautiful, Shun knives features the look and benefits of Damascus steel, an ergonomic handle, and an exceptionally sharp edge. Kyocera Ceramic Knives Longer lasting than steel knives, Kyocera Ceramic Knives are ultra-hard and ultra-sharp. Kasumi Damascus Knives With its true Damascus style, Kasumi Knives are both durable and beautiful. Henckels Miyabi Knives Miyabi knives are a revolutionary cooking tool because of their long-lasting sharpness, smooth cutting ability, rust resistance and handling ease. Japanese Knife Styles These Japanese knives are versatile for western cooking to sushi! Whetstones Whetstones are essential for maintaining your Japanese knives. There are three different grades of whetstones which serve different purposes.
japanese kitchen knife 1

Japanese Kitchen Knife

Japanese Kitchen Knives Often MetroKitchen customer service experts are asked, “What type of knife should I buy? A Japanese knife or a German knife?” It depends on the types of foods you most often cook. We recommend Japanese knives when you cook many veggies, lots of chicken and fish. If you make sushi, check out our selection of sushi knives. Japanese knives have a more narrow angle, approximately 15 degrees as compared to most German knives at 20 to 25 degrees. As a result of this angle, a Japanese knife is a bit sharper but requires more frequent sharpening. These brands are manufactured in Japan and feature Western and Japanese styles of knives.
japanese kitchen knife 2

Japanese Kitchen Knife

Japanese Knives Japanese kitchen cutlery is perhaps more diverse in design, aesthetic style, and materials than any other knife making tradition in the world. Knives vary from being adaptable multipurpose designs like gyutos and santokus to highly specialized designs like yanagibas and debas. Production techniques vary widely too; there are mass produced knives that would not be unfamiliar to most western users and there are rustic, characterful knives made entirely by hand. While it is hard to find a lot of unifying characteristics about Japanese cutlery there are a few commonalities. Japanese cutlery typically uses very high quality steels and those steels are often heat treated to higher levels of hardness than their western counterparts. The result is Japanese cutlery can often take keener edges at more acute bevel angles than their western counterparts giving them the ability to attain high levels of raw performance. However, these knives also tend to be more delicate. For cutlery enthusiasts, Japanese knives both demand and reward better technique from the user. Anyone interested in experiencing Japanese cutlery for the first time should visit the Chef Knives to Go forum for advice from enthusiastic home and professional users with an immense accumulation of experience with Japanese cutlery.
japanese kitchen knife 3

Japanese Kitchen Knife

Often MetroKitchen customer service experts are asked, “What type of knife should I buy? A Japanese knife or a German knife?” It depends on the types of foods you most often cook. We recommend Japanese knives when you cook many veggies, lots of chicken and fish. If you make sushi, check out our selection of sushi knives. Japanese knives have a more narrow angle, approximately 15 degrees as compared to most German knives at 20 to 25 degrees. As a result of this angle, a Japanese knife is a bit sharper but requires more frequent sharpening. These brands are manufactured in Japan and feature Western and Japanese styles of knives.
japanese kitchen knife 4

Japanese Kitchen Knife

Japanese Knives Wa-Bocho, or Japanese-style knives, trace their origin to the days of the Samurai warriors. In fact, the same hand-forging methods used to produce Samurai swords are still used today to create these classic kitchen blades, which are among the finest cutlery available in the culinary world. In traditional Japanese cuisine, special emphasis is placed on highlighting a chef’s skill through intricate knife work. To achieve this mastery, Japanese chefs rely on a variety of specialized Wa-Bocho to prepare vegetables, fish, and meat. Today, Japanese knife manufacturers also make Western-style knives to cater to the needs of chefs all over the world. Having a sharp knife is an essential part of cooking because it will affect the integrity of the ingredients. Select sub-category //
japanese kitchen knife 5

Japanese Kitchen Knife

Japanese kitchen cutlery is perhaps more diverse in design, aesthetic style, and materials than any other knife making tradition in the world. Knives vary from being adaptable multipurpose designs like gyutos and santokus to highly specialized designs like yanagibas and debas. Production techniques vary widely too; there are mass produced knives that would not be unfamiliar to most western users and there are rustic, characterful knives made entirely by hand. While it is hard to find a lot of unifying characteristics about Japanese cutlery there are a few commonalities. Japanese cutlery typically uses very high quality steels and those steels are often heat treated to higher levels of hardness than their western counterparts. The result is Japanese cutlery can often take keener edges at more acute bevel angles than their western counterparts giving them the ability to attain high levels of raw performance. However, these knives also tend to be more delicate. For cutlery enthusiasts, Japanese knives both demand and reward better technique from the user. Anyone interested in experiencing Japanese cutlery for the first time should visit the Chef Knives to Go forum for advice from enthusiastic home and professional users with an immense accumulation of experience with Japanese cutlery.
japanese kitchen knife 6

Japanese Kitchen Knife

Wa-Bocho, or Japanese-style knives, trace their origin to the days of the Samurai warriors. In fact, the same hand-forging methods used to produce Samurai swords are still used today to create these classic kitchen blades, which are among the finest cutlery available in the culinary world. In traditional Japanese cuisine, special emphasis is placed on highlighting a chef’s skill through intricate knife work. To achieve this mastery, Japanese chefs rely on a variety of specialized Wa-Bocho to prepare vegetables, fish, and meat. Today, Japanese knife manufacturers also make Western-style knives to cater to the needs of chefs all over the world. Having a sharp knife is an essential part of cooking because it will affect the integrity of the ingredients.
japanese kitchen knife 7

Japanese Kitchen Knife

Wa-Bocho, or Japanese-style knives, trace their origin to the days of the Samurai warriors. In fact, the same hand-forging methods used to produce Samurai swords are still used today to create these classic kitchen blades, which are among the finest cutlery available in the culinary world. In traditional Japanese cuisine, special emphasis is placed on highlighting a chef’s skill through intricate knife work. To achieve this mastery, Japanese chefs rely on a variety of specialized Wa-Bocho to prepare vegetables, fish, and meat. Today, Japanese knife manufacturers also make Western-style knives to cater to the needs of chefs all over the world. Having a sharp knife is an essential part of cooking because it will affect the integrity of the ingredients. Select sub-category //
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Single bevel knives are knives made in the Japanese tradition and have an omote (front or face on the right for right-handers), a shinogi (where the front bevel meets the flat of the blade face), and a urasuki (backside hollow to release food). These knives are usually a little thicker at the spine and body than Japanese double bevels but are thinner right behind the edge. They leave a better surface finish but the produce must bend a further distance due to the thickness. These are the knives of the established traditional Japanese cuisine and were originally developed from double bevel knives from China. They are sharpened along the single bevel by applying pressure to the shinogi to raise it and to the edge. Honbadzuke is the initial sharpening to form a flat surface along the perimeter of the urasuki to strengthen it, straighten the backside, and lay geometry for future sharpening. The omote is sharpened much more than the urasuki in order to maintain the function of the single bevel. Kansai style knives usually have pointed tip for use standing up (which helps in decorative tip work) and Edo style knives have a square tip for use sitting down (which makes a more robust working knife). The standard Japanese knife kit includes the yanagiba, deba, and usuba. They are essential to Washoku (Japanese cuisine).
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The Japanese utility knife is known as a Santoku knife, and it is becoming more popular because of its better edge retention compared to the common utility knife. The Santoku knife is however, shaped differently from the common utility knife and requires a different cutting technique.
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On the other hand, if you love the Damascus design but budget doesn’t allow you to make that extravagant purchase, try this Yoshihiro Gyuto knife. A Gyuto knife is a Japanese chef knife. The Yoshihiro Gyuto knife gets you the best of both worlds, priced around the range of a Shun Classic, but comes in beautiful hammered layers of VG-10 steel.

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